Krugers Pafuri: Africa Wildlife, National Geographic Documentary HD 2020

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krugers pafuri
krugers pafuri

Krugers Pafuri: African Wildlife

At the northern end of the Krugers Pafuri Park Life depends on one thing, water. In the heat and drought, land Cut a reliable path with one ribbon Through the wilderness. It is a lifeline for all living things, big and small. At the peak of the dry season, Everything should come to the river. From dawn to dusk Animals gather on the banks of the Luvuvhu River Passing through many habitats Of the area known as Pafuri. On the sandy banks of the far north Of the world-famous Krugers Safari Park, A white-crowned lob wing is crossing the territory.

He and his colleagues control a half-mile riverbank. The peak of the dry season The water level is the lowest. This is the best time to nest in the sandbank. The river of lapwings is called Luvuvhu. It passes through a very special wilderness Known as Pafuri. Located in the northeast of South Africa Kruger National Park covers about 7,500 square miles. Papuri is located in the northernmost part. Of this expanse. It is sandwiched between two rivers. Limpopo in the north And south Luvuvhu. When you break the bank They nourish the huge floodplain that covers most of Pafuri. Here the lush lowlands feed the herds of pastures.
The iconic forest grows large and green. Where there is less water, harder plants grow Adds to Papuri’s incredible biodiversity. It’s only 1% of the Krugers safari area, Pafuri is home to 75% of the larger park species. Some of these creatures stand out. In species rarely seen in the rest of the reserve To a bunch of symbolic characters. But above all What sets this place apart are the birds of the pafuri.


Over 450 species are building their homes here. The largest variety in Krugers pafuri park. For many tropical African species, This is the southernmost range of their range. It is midwinter and the peak of the dry season. After a prolonged drought, the huge Limpopo River dried up. But Luvuvhu still flows It becomes a busy watering point for both birds and animals. And the lapwings did well to secure a place in the bank. Almost all wild animals Daily trips to the river are included. In this tough time When the morning of Papuri lights up A herd of Waterbucks graze in a wetland floodplain. Males weigh 550 pounds. These are among the heaviest antelopes in Africa.

They fuel the bulk by feeding. From grasses and herbs rich in protein Floodplains are provided during the dry season. All these proteins cause thirst Waterbuck relies most on water of all nutrition. As the day gets hot They will go down to Luvuvhu for a drink. If not a river They could not survive here during the dry season. The river flows from west to east across the park Shape the landscape and attract wildlife. West of the papuri here Deep canyons are carved through the rocks. Known as Lanner Canyon It is evidence of the steady flow of Luvuvhu for thousands of years.

Further down to the east The rock wool advances to the sandy river bed. Young bull elephant here Arrived early to quench your thirst. Green onions boasting a perennial water source and green growth It is famous for its resident elephant herd. But this bull left his herd Now I am living a more lonely life. Social contact is an essential part of elephant life He would have had the first 15 years. With his mother, siblings, aunts, and cousins. As he goes down the river He sniffs the air for traces of other elephants. If you can find another bachelor group He can join them for fellowship.

But now I am alone. Right downstream, Another group of social creatures makes the house. The bald bee-eater lives in a small family. Consisting of breeding pairs And up to 5 related birds It helps to raise cubs. If it rains in early summer within a few months Dig more nests like this on the riverbank It lays eggs. Rain will spark worm life There will be a lot of food to feed the chicks. Now adults can support themselves To insects around the river. Little water in Luvuvhu Enough to attract a variety of waterfowl. Each starts the day by finding food in their own way. A pair of African jacanas delicately tread the water’s edge. Their long toes help distribute weight. To the floating plant life. Together the pair controls the territory along the bank Provides all the insects you need. A pair of Egyptian goose fodder on aquatic plants It is growing in the river.

They are trapped and eat the most delicious food. Hamerkop takes a more measured approach. He is chasing creatures that live in river vegetation. He prefers a tadpole breakfast But he also catches underwater invertebrates. In the case of a three-row plover, it is all about covering the ground. He moves fast They peck the surface of the water to find insects and their larvae. You will need a lot of these little prey to fill your tummy. Some are enjoying a sufficient supply of food in the river, The Great Egret is looking for something more tricky. It is chasing fish and amphibians, but they are difficult to understand. Perhaps the other point is more productive. Preparing for strike But it fails again.

With one last effort, he comes up with a piece. Not much, but it’s a start. Most birds eat small creatures, Here are some other people looking for larger prey. The banks are lined with the scaly corpses of Nile crocodiles. Get in the sun. Because the Limpopo River in the north is dry Many crocodiles moved to Luvuvhu. Here the water flows deep enough to support them. It is best known for ambushing prey under the water. But crocodiles also eat fish. They use their powerful tails to chase prey underwater. Despite their terrifying appearance, many other creatures It looks comfortable with alligators. Sharpen the fluttering contrast of the butterfly With tough reptiles. It gathers to filter out nutrients.

In the muddy puddle of the bank. The winged gathering attracts its own crowd. Bee-eater. Tricky birds Scrape off the wings before feeding. The bee-eater family will join forces with neighboring families To protect the hunting area From other bee-eaters. The river becomes a magnet for insects during the dry season And bee-eaters There is no risk of sharing a private grocery store. To many animals, Pafuri offers a lot more than Luvuvhu. A teenage bull leaves the river. Going through the bush, looking for a colleague. But he doesn’t go far before his stomach distracts him. A mature elephant bull weighs up to 5 tons. His dinner plate-sized feet Specially evolved to support this enormous weight Thick cushion of fat and fibrous tissue Absorbs pressure. His stem is the perfect tool to get the best leaves. High tree. Riverside plants This is the first snack of his day for the company. Papuri has many other food reserves for elephants. Especially including one kind of tree That the park is famous for.

Known as fever tree Their soft yellow-green husk is unmistakable. Discovery of early settlers People who travel or live near this tree I have a terrible fever. They blamed the tree itself for disease. But the blame is wrong. Fever trees prefer moist areas and often grow near swamps. The real killer’s favorite breeding ground- Mosquitoes that carry malaria. A lush stand of picturesque tall fever trees Icon of Pafuri. They thrive on alluvial soils of floodplains.

Water overflows regularly When the river breaks the embankment. This tranquil shady forest It is a favorite feeding place for many at this time of year. A solitary territory is quietly grazing in the thickets. Not far away, huge elephant bulls hinder peace. He walks across the forest in an unpleasant mood. And soon the reason becomes clear. He has an obstacle to his most powerful tools. It’s an old injury to his trunk. Due to the crocodile’s jaw It is more likely to be a poacher’s snare. He cannot fully extend vertically to reach the leaf. But like all elephants He has the power to bring them down to his own level. When he chooses a tree His amazing power takes care of the rest.

If the leaves are on the ground Finally, he can satisfy his excitement of hunger. Fully eaten, he slowly leaves the forest. Beyond the Fever-Tree, A herd of African water buffaloes is grazing outdoors. The grass is tall in the floodplain But at this time it is dry and chewy. This is not the buffalo stage. Prioritize quantity over quality. You can live from a coarser feed than most room wood. The herd is a moving diner for bull pickaxes. Removes pests and parasites. Despite the impressive horns of adults, The pack is wary of predators Buffalo has young people. Eventually, they spent enough time in the open space. Head to the mo pine bush. These dense forests thrive in the highlands of Papua. It adds another habitat to the park. Mo Pine is well known Due to its ability to withstand dry conditions.

A leaf like a butterfly in the heat Fold to reduce sun exposure. It minimizes moisture loss due to evaporation. They are also Pafuri’s fantastic source of protein for animals. But today brown snake eagle Make the most of the golden tree. You can be here for hours. Navigating around with sharp eyes It is my favorite snake food. If you find one You’ll raid down on the farming and fishing villages. Break the snake’s spine and swallow its head first. Now I’m leisurely spreading my feathers And investigate the coming and going below. If there is a raptor like this around The small inhabitants of Papuri should be watched carefully. In the nearby woodland The desolate termite mound is home to a group of dwarven mongooses.

As the day gets hot The adults come out of the oyster one by one. Shared toilet outside the entrance It gives a clear smell signal that this house is occupied. Less than 8 inches long Has little defense against predators, However, a family of 14 looks on each other’s backs. Move to high sentry To get the best possible vantage point Vigilance is the key- There are cubs to protect. They are the dominant male and female offspring It is about 6 weeks old. The whole pack works together to grow them. This includes the important work of babysitting. And the standing guard. The lower female sucks the pups Some have never conceived themselves. The rest of the herd finds food and scrapes it off. With long claws.

In the thickets of dry woodland, There is a lot of food to eat. A millipede is known locally as “shongololo”, It will be a juicy snack. It moves slowly despite the many legs. Must be good to escape Before the mongoose smells Little hunters do most of their gathering on the ground. Millipede makes a lucky choice When climbing trees safely. While the mongoose is hunting Others run slowly and steadily throughout the morning. The Elephant mother is on the move with two young men. They drifted in the herd. To find good feed in dry woodland.

Leaf like a butterfly in heat Fold it up to reduce sun exposure. It minimizes moisture loss due to evaporation. They are also a fantastic source of protein from papuri for animals. But today brown snake eagle Make the most of the golden tree. You may be here for hours. Navigating around with sharp eyes This is my favorite snake food. Find one It will raid rural villages. Break the snake’s spine and swallow its head first. Now I’m spreading my feathers leisurely And investigate what goes down and down. If there is a raptor like this around The small inhabitants of Papuri should be carefully observed.

Near in the forest The desolate termite mound is home to a group of dwarven mongooses. As the day gets hotter The adults come out of the oyster one by one. Public restroom outside the entrance It gives a clear smell sign that this house is occupied. Less than 8 inches Has little defense against predators, However, a family of 14 looks at each other’s backs. Go to high sentry To get the best vantage point Vigilance is the key. There are cubs to protect. They are the dominant male and female offspring It is about 6 weeks old. The whole pack works together to grow. This includes the important work of babysitting. And standing guard. Lower female sucks offspring Some people have never imagined themselves.

The rest of the herd finds and scrapes food. With long claws. In the thickets of dry woodland, There is a lot of food to eat. A millipede is known locally as “shongololo”, It will be a juicy snack. It moves slowly despite the many legs. I think it’s good to escape Before you smell the mongoose Little hunters do most of their gathering on the ground. Millipede makes a lucky choice When climbing trees safely. While the mongoose is hunting Others are running slowly and steadily throughout the morning. The Elephant mother is moving with two young people. They drifted in the herd. To find good feed in the dry forest

Although the young calf is the offspring of cattle. Always be close to her for safety. Whereabouts of another calf mother It’s difficult to say, but it’s a sad possibility. Poachers killed her for tusks. The three will soon have to rejoin the extended family. The Papuri has a lion Protection within the herd is important for young elephants.

Far from Luvuvhu, several small wetlands remain. This fan formed from spilled surface water During the last rain Enough to withstand the dry season. Towed 6 large bulls. Among them are young bulls. I was in the river this morning The meeting in the water finally gives him a colleague. Heavyweights with injured torso are also here. You can’t compete with the largest of these bachelors. He wears a tracking collar Researchers have followed him In the last 10 years. He is now in his prime at around 45 years old. I have been picking up my own scars for a long life. If everything goes well, he can live up to about 60 years old. The other bull gives him enough space. In water to quench thirst.

Bull with injured torso Learned to live with his handicap. To get maximum suction power He dips his torso in the water at an angle. This closes the wound so it does not suck in air. But when he sprinkles it in his mouth it is defeat. It is equivalent to an elephant. Drinking through a straw with holes. With this constant obstacle His agitation from early that day Easy to understand. However, nothing calms an elephant like a trip to the water. And it always includes good bouncing. The tree serves as your favorite scratching post. And the last layer of dust Protects from the hot afternoon sun.

When the elephant is over It is the birds of the papuri that make the splash. Fork tail drone expensive self bath Jump into the water for a while before flying away It’s the epitome of fast water play. A bunch of small impalas arrive for a quick drink. They bow their heads to the water and are vulnerable. Go quickly. With the onset of the midday heat, many people in Papuri look for water. The afternoon is particularly busy on the banks of the Luvuvhu river. The river attracts all of Pafuri’s diverse lives. It includes some that are rarely seen elsewhere on the continent. Nyala is a particularly shy nutrition. It usually sticks to dense forested areas near water. The riverside forests here are the perfect habitat for them. Even if you are thirsty They are careful around the water. This is alligator territory. Across the river, The female Nyala arrived with her two offspring.

They are as cautious as males and for good reason. Young alligators are probably too small to catch their mother. But it could be a chance for fawn And they don’t take any risk. Down Stream of Lush Waterbuck Their young people also arrived. Even in winter, temperatures can exceed 80 degrees Fahrenheit. The soft, moist sand relieves coolness. Most of it in the water comes with the company. However, the old buffalo bull arrived alone. He retired from the race for life You no longer have to wait for hundreds of pack mates. To quench their thirst before he leaves. He is not the only old man in the bank. The boar’s massive face mass proves his age. Quench your thirst and turn your attention to food. It is difficult for green grass to come out in the deep dry season. And Warthogs seize the chance for a good meal. Riverside growth is a valuable source of food. For some, banks offer special treatment. Acacia seed pods are a favorite snack. For Chacma Baboon.

Arms as long as legs Baboons have evolved to be able to walk on the ground Than any other monkey. But young people Completely comfortable in the wood Even when choosing a path through the thorns. For all animals, rivers provide food and water And some relief from the afternoon heat. For birds, the constant flow serves another important purpose. Most birds need a bath Keep your feathers in top condition for flight. River It’s one of the few places you can do that at this time of year. And they make the most of the purification flow. The white-crowned lapwing falls into an afternoon bath. Bathing isn’t the only important part of maintaining your feathers. Others in the river trying to get rid of dirt and parasites. Each feather is carefully arranged in a suitable location. Woolly stork One of the largest birds in the river today But it is dwarfed by its cousin, the Birds Beak Stork.

It can reach 5 feet in height. Like all other creatures Big birds are attracted to Luvuvhu by the charm of the water. 11 pound white backed eagle Drink water and take a bath every day. However, of all Pafuri’s birds, one species dominates the nest. As the name implies The African Fish Eagle specializes in catching fish. Unlike small birds, low flow rivers Little food is served here. However, eagles are resourceful. They prey on a variety of small creatures. Includes waterfowl. They are also fearless thieves. Steal other people’s prey as big as a saddle beaked stork.

Article Source: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/

All this makes them powerful river companions. For other species. Like everyone here, they should drink too. Water droplets of the river here Enough to meet the needs of birds. But there is one inhabitant of Papuri. Whose needs are much greater. Hippos need deep enough water To completely sink their great bodies. In the dry season Few places this exist in Pafuri. Where Luvuvhu meets Limpopo’s dry bed, In the eastern corner of the papuri It formed a natural dam deep enough to hold hippopotamus pods. These giant animals have sensitive skin. Most of the time in the water To escape from solar heat This bull is in charge here. If he had to claim his control You can open your chin to 150 degrees It reveals a 20-inch long tusk.

Now I am taking a pod and relaxing in cool water. When Luvuvhu is over Riverbed of the great Limpopo It glows white in the afternoon sun. Known as Crook Corner This point forms the boundary between the three countries. Southwest from South Africa, Zimbabwe to the northeast, Mozambique to the east. From here the Luvuvhu River ends. Flowing steadily to the east Meet boundaries that cannot be crossed In the wide sands of Limpopo. For Pafuri’s creatures, Luvuvhu did the job. Water on another hot, dry day. When the evening comes Waterbuck is returning and grazing in the floodplain. They enjoy the cool and calm end of the day. A young elephant mother and cub found a herd.

They appear to cross the plains to drink in the river. At the bank of Luvuvhu Baboon troops spend some time on the shore Before going to bed before heading to the top of the tree. The river is a picture of peace until the elephants come here. The cool, soft sand is a welcome relief after long, hot days. Luvuvhu’s bank is a place of reunion. Earlier, the baby found her mother I enjoy the river by her side. The herd takes time to refuel with food and water. As long as Luvuvhu keeps flowing Through this special reserve Pafuri’s creatures will thrive Despite the harshness of the dry season. Heavy rain will come sooner or later. Rim Popo flows again Floods will flood the plains to spur new growth. Until then, elephants and others can find everything they need. Along the banks of Pafuri’s eternal lifeline.

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